Sunday, November 30, 2008

Fantastic Four 561


"The Death of the Invisible Woman" is so far a great arc. When I last reviewed this title, waaaay back in September, I was really jazzed. Millar and Hitch managed to make an interesting story, with great art, and decent characterization. All good. But have they kept the quality up with
Fantastic Four 561? Let's dive in.

It's endgame for the New Defenders and the future Invisible Woman as they siphon the combined energies of Doom and Johnny. Reed comes up with a clever way to track the Invisible Woman, and then the three Fantastic take on the New Defenders, including a possible future Wolverine. The New Defenders' plan to bring eight billion people into the world is - ahem - aborted, while the first arc's Nu-World is dusted off and used appropriately. Then, future Sue goes up to Doom and commits suicide, sort of.

Very well drawn. I would f*Very well drawn. I would f*$&ing hope so, considering this issue and the previous issue were late, contrary to strenuous promises otherwise. I really love Hitch's sense of action dynamic, placing the "camera" in the most logical spot, to show the most prevalent detail. It's a skill that many an artist lack.
amp;ing hope so, considering this issue and the previous issue were late, contrary to strenuous promises otherwise. I really love Hitch's sense of action dynamic, placing the "camera" in the most logical spot, to show the most prevalent detail. It's a skill that many an artist lack.

But the story? Well, the story is decent. The clever way that Reed tracks Sue is by implanting an indestructible tracker into Present-Sue's bloodstream, which Future-Sue will still have two hundred years hence. Very clever.

However, the not-so clever part? Why does Future-Sue go up to Doom if she knows that Doom is going to incinerate her? She mentions that it's weird seeing it from the opposite angle. Here's my problem. If Future-Sue knows that she's going to die, she obviously remembers the incident. Why wouldn't have also remembered the resolution and the use of Nu-World? Strange indeed, and that doesn't even take into account the apparent suicide she commits?

I liked the climax to this arc, and thought the quality was kept up. However, time travel stories are often confusing and never make a lick of sense, other than Morrison's
DC One Million.

Millar and Hitch, let's keep up the good work, okeedokee?

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